Anonymous asked:

Canada a racist country? Sure racists live here, racists live everywhere, but people learn about Canada all over the world because we're a great example of multiculturalism. Seriously, I have friends in many countries that learn about us and our diversity. Do we have problems? Of course we do, every nation does. Are the Harper cons terrible? Of course they are. But to think Canada is terrible and racist is ignorant. Try learning more you idiot.

glockgal:

Also to add to the mosaic of racism in Canada, see the incident of Komagata Maru.  A quote from the article:

kaalashnikov:

'But to think Canada is terrible and racist is ignorant.'

'But to think Canada is terrible and racist is ignorant.'

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“I have no ill-feeling against people coming from Asia personally,” he told the crowd, “but I reaffirm that the national life of Canada will not permit any large degree of immigration from Asia … I intend to stand up absolutely on all occasions on this one great principle—of a white country and a white British Columbia.” Stevens’ speech was followed by “thunderous applause.”

atttc:

Photographs of the community of Africville on the Bedford Basin in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Settled by American refugees during the war of 1812, Africville was a self-sufficient Black Nova Scotian community which was expropriated from its residents and razed during the years of 1964 - 1967 by the government of the City of Halifax.
More information:
http://africville.ca/
http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/africville/
Zoom Info
atttc:

Photographs of the community of Africville on the Bedford Basin in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Settled by American refugees during the war of 1812, Africville was a self-sufficient Black Nova Scotian community which was expropriated from its residents and razed during the years of 1964 - 1967 by the government of the City of Halifax.
More information:
http://africville.ca/
http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/africville/
Zoom Info
atttc:

Photographs of the community of Africville on the Bedford Basin in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Settled by American refugees during the war of 1812, Africville was a self-sufficient Black Nova Scotian community which was expropriated from its residents and razed during the years of 1964 - 1967 by the government of the City of Halifax.
More information:
http://africville.ca/
http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/africville/
Zoom Info
atttc:

Photographs of the community of Africville on the Bedford Basin in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Settled by American refugees during the war of 1812, Africville was a self-sufficient Black Nova Scotian community which was expropriated from its residents and razed during the years of 1964 - 1967 by the government of the City of Halifax.
More information:
http://africville.ca/
http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/africville/
Zoom Info
atttc:

Photographs of the community of Africville on the Bedford Basin in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Settled by American refugees during the war of 1812, Africville was a self-sufficient Black Nova Scotian community which was expropriated from its residents and razed during the years of 1964 - 1967 by the government of the City of Halifax.
More information:
http://africville.ca/
http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/africville/
Zoom Info
atttc:

Photographs of the community of Africville on the Bedford Basin in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Settled by American refugees during the war of 1812, Africville was a self-sufficient Black Nova Scotian community which was expropriated from its residents and razed during the years of 1964 - 1967 by the government of the City of Halifax.
More information:
http://africville.ca/
http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/africville/
Zoom Info
atttc:

Photographs of the community of Africville on the Bedford Basin in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Settled by American refugees during the war of 1812, Africville was a self-sufficient Black Nova Scotian community which was expropriated from its residents and razed during the years of 1964 - 1967 by the government of the City of Halifax.
More information:
http://africville.ca/
http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/africville/
Zoom Info

atttc:

Photographs of the community of Africville on the Bedford Basin in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Settled by American refugees during the war of 1812, Africville was a self-sufficient Black Nova Scotian community which was expropriated from its residents and razed during the years of 1964 - 1967 by the government of the City of Halifax.

More information:

http://africville.ca/

http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/africville/

(via ayiman-deactivated20141010)

zuky:

From the early 1900s to the 1960s, the downtown eastside neighbourhood of Strathcona was home to Vancouver’s thriving Black community. Black Strathcona is a new art project which tells the stories of some of the people and places which made up that historic neighborhood, from well-known musicians like Jimi Hendrix to anonymous activists and organizers who made a positive impact on the world. These stories are told through videos which can be watched on mobile devices while walking through Vancouver, downloaded via QR Codes which are posted on signs at historic city locations. Here’s one of 10 videos which have been produced so far, telling the story of Hogan’s Alley, which was once the heart of Black Strathcona, until white people did their usual routine of building a highway on top of communities of color for the sole purpose of destroying the neighbourhood.

AAAAAAAAAAA I was just bemoaning the other day the lack of an NFB documentary about Hogan’s Alley, and now here’s some film about it!  

This is most excellent, thank you for posting it!

thisisnotchina:

This is a new degree that’s being offered at my university, the University of British Columbia.
I invite you to take a good look at the second “highlight”:

Address global problems arising from Asian growth and transformation including challenges of sustainability.

My response?
Wow. Holy fuck, UBC. No. If this is the kind of problematic, racist mindset you’re going to put behind your “Master of Public Policy” degree, you need to scrap the whole thing, go sit in a corner, and think really hard about all the wrong decisions you’ve made in your life. You may be there a while, goodness knows you’ve made a lot.Global problems (especially regarding sustainability) aren’t arising because Asian countries are growing and transforming. Global problems arose because the West established and perpetuates unsustainable standards of living, forcibly pushes their model on other countries and tells them that they matter less if they aren’t at those arbitrary standards, and didn’t even pretend to listen when scientists and other academics came out to tell policy makers that there was a problem.That’s a highlight of your program?*Blaming Asian countries for following a standard Western ones established and holds up as ideal in the international community?**Framing sustainability challenges as issues that are coming up because Other Countries are becoming more advanced?*NO. No no no no NO.Recognise that you are part of the culture that STARTED THE PROBLEM. Own up to your own mistakes. Don’t blame others.Oh, but wait, I guess if you were able to do those things, you wouldn’t be teaching people how to make public policy, now would you?
I’m currently taking the survey. I am not happy. I want this to be spread as far and as wide as possible. I’ve submitted it here as well as at AngryAsianGirlsUnited. 
UBC absolutely needs to be shamed for this.
————————————-
As a Chinese-Canadian with close friends from Vancouver or attending UBC this is very disappointing. Time after time I hear stories reminding me of the fact that the other side of the coin of Vancouver’s large Asian population is the “yellow peril” attitude of many white Vancouverites. This program seems to follow that line of thinking.
Thanks for sharing, and I’m glad you responded to their survey.
-n

GOOD OLD FUCKING UBC
I am so not surprised, considering Vancouverites snicker that UBC stands for “University of a Billion Chinese”. 

thisisnotchina:

This is a new degree that’s being offered at my university, the University of British Columbia.

I invite you to take a good look at the second “highlight”:

Address global problems arising from Asian growth and transformation including challenges of sustainability.

My response?

Wow. Holy fuck, UBC. No. If this is the kind of problematic, racist mindset you’re going to put behind your “Master of Public Policy” degree, you need to scrap the whole thing, go sit in a corner, and think really hard about all the wrong decisions you’ve made in your life. You may be there a while, goodness knows you’ve made a lot.

Global problems (especially regarding sustainability) aren’t arising because Asian countries are growing and transforming. Global problems arose because the West established and perpetuates unsustainable standards of living, forcibly pushes their model on other countries and tells them that they matter less if they aren’t at those arbitrary standards, and didn’t even pretend to listen when scientists and other academics came out to tell policy makers that there was a problem.

That’s a highlight of your program?

*Blaming Asian countries for following a standard Western ones established and holds up as ideal in the international community?*

*Framing sustainability challenges as issues that are coming up because Other Countries are becoming more advanced?*

NO. No no no no NO.

Recognise that you are part of the culture that STARTED THE PROBLEM. Own up to your own mistakes. Don’t blame others.

Oh, but wait, I guess if you were able to do those things, you wouldn’t be teaching people how to make public policy, now would you?

I’m currently taking the survey. I am not happy. I want this to be spread as far and as wide as possible. I’ve submitted it here as well as at AngryAsianGirlsUnited.

UBC absolutely needs to be shamed for this.

————————————-

As a Chinese-Canadian with close friends from Vancouver or attending UBC this is very disappointing. Time after time I hear stories reminding me of the fact that the other side of the coin of Vancouver’s large Asian population is the “yellow peril” attitude of many white Vancouverites. This program seems to follow that line of thinking.

Thanks for sharing, and I’m glad you responded to their survey.

-n

GOOD OLD FUCKING UBC

I am so not surprised, considering Vancouverites snicker that UBC stands for “University of a Billion Chinese”. 

(via rob-anybody)

The National Film Board has a Black History Month playlist!
I’ve seen “Speakers for the Dead” and “Remember Africville” and highly, highly recommend them. Both documentaries deal with the erasures of black communities and histories in Canada. I’m hoping that someday the NFB will have a film about the destruction of Hogan’s Alley out here in Coast Salish/BC.
"The Road Taken" and "Joe" look like they’ll be my next watches, since the train porters and Joe Fortes are both highly relevant to me as a Vancouverite!

The National Film Board has a Black History Month playlist!

I’ve seen “Speakers for the Dead” and “Remember Africville” and highly, highly recommend them. Both documentaries deal with the erasures of black communities and histories in Canada. I’m hoping that someday the NFB will have a film about the destruction of Hogan’s Alley out here in Coast Salish/BC.

"The Road Taken" and "Joe" look like they’ll be my next watches, since the train porters and Joe Fortes are both highly relevant to me as a Vancouverite!

5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)
[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.
Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 
THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996
Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991
MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012
THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013
Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997
Usufruct 1995
INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012
Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).
Zoom Info
5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)
[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.
Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 
THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996
Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991
MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012
THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013
Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997
Usufruct 1995
INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012
Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).
Zoom Info
5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)
[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.
Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 
THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996
Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991
MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012
THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013
Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997
Usufruct 1995
INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012
Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).
Zoom Info
5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)
[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.
Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 
THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996
Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991
MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012
THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013
Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997
Usufruct 1995
INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012
Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).
Zoom Info
5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)
[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.
Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 
THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996
Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991
MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012
THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013
Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997
Usufruct 1995
INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012
Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).
Zoom Info
5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)
[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.
Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 
THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996
Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991
MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012
THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013
Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997
Usufruct 1995
INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012
Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).
Zoom Info
5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)
[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.
Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 
THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996
Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991
MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012
THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013
Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997
Usufruct 1995
INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012
Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).
Zoom Info
5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)
[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.
Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 
THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996
Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991
MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012
THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013
Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997
Usufruct 1995
INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012
Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).
Zoom Info

5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)

[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.

Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 

THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996

Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991

MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012

THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013

Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997

Usufruct 1995

INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012

Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).

(via apihtawikosisan-deactivated2014)

qbits:

Two stamps issued to commemorate Black History Month in Canada one for Africville on the east coast (Halifax) and one for Hogan’s Alley on the west coast (Vancouver).While the stamp paints a rather idyllic picture of children smiling in front of the church in Africville the reality is the residents were evicted and their homes razed to the ground between 1964 and 1967. The people and their property were packed into city garbage trucks and relocated to the middle of nowhere Nova Scotia. A park was created in the 1980’s to protect the land from development but it wasn’t until 2010 that a formal apology was made and the church rebuilt (it had been demolished in the middle of the night in 1969) to serve as a church and interpretative centre. The re-opening ceremony was held in 2011. Somehow, I don’t get this history from the stamp.As for the stamp featuring Hogan’s Alley in Vancouver, BC, from wikipedia:Today, the block or so that is left of the alley itself bears little to no mark that there was ever a black presence there, and is an indistinct part of Strathcona facing an empty lot adjacent to the busy Main Street on-ramps to the viaduct.One remaining landmark that suggests a black community was active in the Strathcona neighbourhood during the first six decades of the  twentieth century is the Jimi Hendrix Shrine. The shrine, located on the corner of Union and Main, was created to celebrate the connection between Hendrix and Vancouver. Nora Hendrix, born in Knoxville, Tennessee and grandmother to the late musician, migrated to Vancouver in 1911 and lived in and around Hogan’s Alley.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hogan%27s_Alley,_Vancouver
Zoom Info
qbits:

Two stamps issued to commemorate Black History Month in Canada one for Africville on the east coast (Halifax) and one for Hogan’s Alley on the west coast (Vancouver).While the stamp paints a rather idyllic picture of children smiling in front of the church in Africville the reality is the residents were evicted and their homes razed to the ground between 1964 and 1967. The people and their property were packed into city garbage trucks and relocated to the middle of nowhere Nova Scotia. A park was created in the 1980’s to protect the land from development but it wasn’t until 2010 that a formal apology was made and the church rebuilt (it had been demolished in the middle of the night in 1969) to serve as a church and interpretative centre. The re-opening ceremony was held in 2011. Somehow, I don’t get this history from the stamp.As for the stamp featuring Hogan’s Alley in Vancouver, BC, from wikipedia:Today, the block or so that is left of the alley itself bears little to no mark that there was ever a black presence there, and is an indistinct part of Strathcona facing an empty lot adjacent to the busy Main Street on-ramps to the viaduct.One remaining landmark that suggests a black community was active in the Strathcona neighbourhood during the first six decades of the  twentieth century is the Jimi Hendrix Shrine. The shrine, located on the corner of Union and Main, was created to celebrate the connection between Hendrix and Vancouver. Nora Hendrix, born in Knoxville, Tennessee and grandmother to the late musician, migrated to Vancouver in 1911 and lived in and around Hogan’s Alley.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hogan%27s_Alley,_Vancouver
Zoom Info

qbits:

Two stamps issued to commemorate Black History Month in Canada one for Africville on the east coast (Halifax) and one for Hogan’s Alley on the west coast (Vancouver).

While the stamp paints a rather idyllic picture of children smiling in front of the church in Africville the reality is the residents were evicted and their homes razed to the ground between 1964 and 1967. The people and their property were packed into city garbage trucks and relocated to the middle of nowhere Nova Scotia. A park was created in the 1980’s to protect the land from development but it wasn’t until 2010 that a formal apology was made and the church rebuilt (it had been demolished in the middle of the night in 1969) to serve as a church and interpretative centre. The re-opening ceremony was held in 2011. Somehow, I don’t get this history from the stamp.

As for the stamp featuring Hogan’s Alley in Vancouver, BC, from wikipedia:

Today, the block or so that is left of the alley itself bears little to no mark that there was ever a black presence there, and is an indistinct part of Strathcona facing an empty lot adjacent to the busy Main Street on-ramps to the viaduct.

One remaining landmark that suggests a black community was active in the Strathcona neighbourhood during the first six decades of the  twentieth century is the Jimi Hendrix Shrine. The shrine, located on the corner of Union and Main, was created to celebrate the connection between Hendrix and Vancouver. Nora Hendrix, born in Knoxville, Tennessee and grandmother to the late musician, migrated to Vancouver in 1911 and lived in and around Hogan’s Alley.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hogan%27s_Alley,_Vancouver

(via scrollgirl)

zuky:

Here you see 洪门 Hóngmén, a.k.a. Chinese Freemasons, probably the oldest organization to march in the Chinese New Year Parade. They have nothing to do with the Freemasons as known in the West, so I don’t particularly like the English name but it’s one that has stuck.
The organization has roots in the 天地會 Tiāndìhuì, or Heaven and Earth Society, a secret society founded in southern China in the 1760s in opposition to the corruption of the Qing dynasty — a familiar story to fans of kung fu movies. In the 1800s, the Heaven and Earth Society actively promoted the idea of a “Ming restoration”, i.e. overthrowing Manchu rule and returning China to Han sovereignty and the former glory of the Ming dynasty. 
Here in BC, the first Hóngmén society was founded in 1863 in the mining town of Barkerville which was home to some 5,000 Chinese miners. They established a lodge in Vancouver in 1892, and began publishing a Chinese-language newspaper in 1907. Here their function was more civic than political, a mutual aid society which worked on behalf of Chinese immigrants and merchants, organizing youth groups, arts and culture programs, subsidized housing, recreational facilities, social clubs, business networks.
Today, there are some 40 Hóngmén societies across Canada, which were united federally as the Chinese Freemasons of Canada in 1971. They operate two non-profit housing projects in Vancouver and are active in many community events, such as Chinese New Year festivities.

zuky:

Here you see 洪门 Hóngmén, a.k.a. Chinese Freemasons, probably the oldest organization to march in the Chinese New Year Parade. They have nothing to do with the Freemasons as known in the West, so I don’t particularly like the English name but it’s one that has stuck.

The organization has roots in the 天地會 Tiāndìhuì, or Heaven and Earth Society, a secret society founded in southern China in the 1760s in opposition to the corruption of the Qing dynasty — a familiar story to fans of kung fu movies. In the 1800s, the Heaven and Earth Society actively promoted the idea of a “Ming restoration”, i.e. overthrowing Manchu rule and returning China to Han sovereignty and the former glory of the Ming dynasty. 

Here in BC, the first Hóngmén society was founded in 1863 in the mining town of Barkerville which was home to some 5,000 Chinese miners. They established a lodge in Vancouver in 1892, and began publishing a Chinese-language newspaper in 1907. Here their function was more civic than political, a mutual aid society which worked on behalf of Chinese immigrants and merchants, organizing youth groups, arts and culture programs, subsidized housing, recreational facilities, social clubs, business networks.

Today, there are some 40 Hóngmén societies across Canada, which were united federally as the Chinese Freemasons of Canada in 1971. They operate two non-profit housing projects in Vancouver and are active in many community events, such as Chinese New Year festivities.

Most upsetting thing I’ve learned this semester: African Americans took thirty years to establish Seneca Village, NYC as an autonomous village with churches, homes, organizations where they could have freedom and exert political control. The village was destroyed by white backlash culminating in the creation of Central Park on that site to, which successfully erased it from the city’s history.

gwendolynfaker:

theblackamericanprincess:

niggaimdeadass:

babybutta:

The fucking tears in my eyes right now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seneca_Village

http://projects.ilt.columbia.edu/seneca/start.html

See; Africville.

See: Hogan’s Alley.

(via scrollgirl)

averagebare:

"if you feminists want equality does that mean you think it’s cool if men hit women?" how about 1 in 3 women experience domestic violence you giant dookie. how about men already do hit women. how about domestic violence is the no.1 cause of injury to women between ages 15 & 44. how about i switch your apple juice with piss. how about that 

I found an NFB documentary on Netflix called Status Quo: The Unfinished Business of Feminism in Canada today, and watched MP Margaret Mitchell stand up in the House of Commons to report that 1 in 10 Canadian men beats his wife — and be laughed at by the men around her. They literally LAUGHED when she said that men beat their wives in this country. And this was in 1982, which was supposedly a point at which women had achieved ‘equality’.

Another female MP stood up to support Mitchell’s demand for attention to be brought the the issue, and she rephrased it to say that 1 in 10 Canadian women suffers domestic abuse. Because she phrased it in a way that made the victimization of women the forefront, the men didn’t laugh; that, after all, is the norm. Women, as in the nebulous conception of women, are always victims. But when Mitchell named men as the abusers, that brought nothing but derision and laughter.

(via apihtawikosisan-deactivated2014)